I2C (OLED)

This tutorial will explain how to connect and setup an I2C OLED screen to display System Status as show in the following captures :

system status system time

Info

You can find I2C OLED display on Aliexpress.com. Search for "i2c oled 1.3".

Connect OLED Display

The I2C interface on Helios4 board is located at header J9 which exposes the SoC I2C Bus 1. Below is the header pin-out, the little arrow on the PCB indicates the GND pin.

I2C Pinout

You will need to use Female to Female Jumper Wire (a.k.a Dupont Cable) to connect your display to Helios4 board.

Connect matching pin on each side (GND to GND, VDD to VDD, SDA to SDA, etc...). Ideally you use cables of different colors to easily check that your wiring is correct.

oled i2c wiring board i2c wiring

Check I2C Communication

To check if the system can communicate with the OLED device, we should first scan the I2C bus to see if we can detect the device.

  1. Install the Linux i2c tools.
$ sudo apt-get install i2c-tools
  1. Use i2cdetect tool to scan I2C Bus 1.
root@helios4:~# i2cdetect -y 1

     0  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  a  b  c  d  e  f
00:          -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --
10: -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --
20: -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --
30: -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 3c -- -- --
40: -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --
50: -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --
60: -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --
70: -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --   

Here we can see there is a device detected at the address 0x3c. We can conclude is our OLED screen, unless you have connected more than just one I2C device on the J9 header.

SYS-OLED Application

sys-oled is an application to display Helios4 system status on I2C OLED display.

Installation

git clone https://github.com/helios-4/sys-oled.git
cd sys-oled
sudo ./install.sh

Configuration

1. Configure OLED display model

Test which display model is the correct one by launching manually sys-oled and trying different display model as parameter until the System Status is showing correctly on the display.

Example :

sudo sys-oled --display ssd1306
sudo sys-oled --display sh1106

Supported values : ssd1306 (default), ssd1322, ssd1325, ssd1327, ssd1331, ssd1351, sh1106.

Once you know which display model is the correct one, edit /usr/local/etc/sys-oled.conf and update the DISPLAY= line.

2. Configure storage info

For now sys-oled is a very crude python app that will require you to edit it directly in order to customize what you want to display.

Edit sys-oled script and look for the status() function.

sudo nano /usr/local/bin/sys-oled

You can edit the following lines to define for which storage devices you want to display info.

d.text((0, 27), disk_usage('sd', '/'), font=font, fill="white")
d.text((0, 39), disk_usage('md0', '/mnt/md0'), font=font, fill="white")

In the above example, we are displaying sd (SDcard) usage which is the rootfs mounted on '/'. We are also displaying md0 (RAID array) that is mounted on '/mnt/mnd0'. The values (0, 27) and (0, 39) correspond to the X, Y positions of displayed texts.

3. Start the service

The install script will have automatically setup sys-oled to start at every startup. Now you can either restart your Helios4 or you can launch directly the service with the following command:

systemctl start sys-oled.service

Note

This sys-oled app was developed and tested only with the OLED model SH1106 which has a matrix panel of 132 x 64. If you use a different model that has a smaller resolution, you might need to tweak the coordinate values.